Barrister James Robottom

James Robottom

Year of call: 2009  

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“Excellent advocacy skills, nothing will be left uncovered, he always goes the extra mile for clients”

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Overview


Since being taken on as a tenant at 7BR, in September 2010, James has appeared unled in the Queen’s Bench, Family, and Chancery Divisions of the High Court, the Employment Appeal Tribunal, and the Court of Appeal. James has a multi-disciplinary practice, with particular focus on and experience in inquests and clinical negligence, human rights law, criminal and fraud law (including international criminal law), and employment and discrimination.

James graduated with a first in English Literature from the University of Sheffield and an MA with distinction from King’s College London, where he is a former visiting tutor in law. He is a Lord Bowen, Lord Denning, and Hardwicke Scholar of Lincoln’s Inn.

In 2011 his report on prison conditions in Jamaica, with an overview by Alison McDonald and Tim Owen QC, and an afterword by Baroness Stern, was published by the Death Penalty Project.

Clinical Negligence Complex fraud Crime Employment Personal Injury Public Law & Inquiries

Clinical Negligence


James advises on a range of types of clinical claims, including failure to diagnose, incompetent surgical procedures, and inadequate risk management. His clinical negligence practice is closely linked with his extensive inquest experience.

Inquests & Judicial Review Human Rights Act Cases

Inquests & Judicial Review


James has extensive experience representing bereaved families at lengthy clinical inquests and in subsequent civil claims. His recent inquest experience includes: Representing the family of Tallulah Wilson, who took her own life in October 2012 after having become involved with self-harm and suicide related blogs and websites. The case received nationwide media coverage:

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Representing the brother of Patrick Whiting at the Article 2 ECHR, jury inquest into his death. Patrick hanged himself following multiple failures on the part of the mental health trust charged with his care:

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Representing the family of Gwendolen Bingham, who died following a successful knee replacement revision operation, as a result of a failure to monitor and adequately care for her in hospital over during a weekend, leading to renal failure.

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Representing the family of George Mason, an elderly dementia patient, and known wandering risk, who was allowed to go missing repeatedly from a care home before he tragically drowned in the river Chelmer.

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Human Rights Act Cases


James has particular expertise in the relationship between clinical care and human rights law. He regularly acts for and advises clients in relation to the positive and negative duties under Articles 2, 3, 4, and 8 ECHR. He has particular experience in relation to both the operative and systemic substantive duties under Article 2 ECHR.

Clinical Negligence Cases


Representing the family of Tallulah Wilson, who took her own life in October 2012 after having become involved with self-harm and suicide related blogs and websites. The case received nationwide media coverage.

Click here to view more information

Representing the brother of Patrick Whiting at the Article 2 ECHR, jury inquest into his death. Patrick hanged himself following multiple failures on the part of the mental health trust charged with his care.

Click here to view more information

Representing the family of Gwendolen Bingham, who died following a successful knee replacement revision operation, as a result of a failure to monitor and adequately care for her in hospital over during a weekend, leading to renal failure.

Click here to view more information

Representing the family of George Mason, an elderly dementia patient, and known wandering risk, who was allowed to go missing repeatedly from a care home before he tragically drowned in the river Chelmer.

Click here to view more information

Complex fraud


James has expertise in extradition, complex fraud, public and human rights law, and international criminal law. He is regularly instructed as a junior on high profile complex fraud matters, both in the UK and in offshore jurisdictions.

After gaining tenancy James spent 9 months on secondment at Peters & Peters LLP where he gained experience and expertise in complex fraud, extradition, international sanctions, export control and corruption cases.

Before coming to the bar, James gained an MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice from King’s College London (KCL), for which he gained a distinction, was top in his year, and won the KCL Directors Prize in Criminology and Criminal Justice. He is a former visiting tutor in Criminology and Criminal Justice at KCL and has published and has particular academic expertise in prisons, sentencing, parole and human rights law. In 2011 his report on prison conditions in Jamaica, with an overview by Alison McDonald and Tim Owen QC, and an afterword by Baroness Stern, was published by the Death Penalty Project.

Click here to view more information

Memberships


  • Young Fraud Lawyers Association

Crime


James appears regularly on behalf of both Defendants and the CPS in the crown court. He has extensive trial experience including matters involving allegations of robbery, burglary, serious assaults, possession of firearms, sexual offences and dangerous driving. James is a grade 2 prosecution advocate.

Before coming to the bar, James gained an MA in Criminology and Criminal Justice from King’s College London (KCL), for which he gained a distinction, was top in his year, and won the KCL Directors Prize in Criminology and Criminal Justice. He is a former visiting tutor in Criminology and Criminal Justice at KCL and has published and has particular academic expertise in prisons, sentencing, parole and human rights law. In 2011 his report on prison conditions in Jamaica, with an overview by Alison McDonald and Tim Owen QC, and an afterword by Baroness Stern, was published by the Death Penalty Project. The report can be viewed here.

Employment


James regularly appears in the Employment Tribunal and advises on behalf of both claimants and respondents.

He is experienced in a wide range of tribunal claims including unfair dismissals, constructive dismissals, direct and indirect-discrimination claims, victimisation and harassment claims, equal pay, minimum wage claims, claims concerning the incorporation of collective agreements, and claims under TUPE.

James has been instructed by the Anti-Trafficking and Forced Labour Exploitation Unit on a series of Tribunal claims relating to the working conditions of migrant domestic workers. One of those claims – Onu v Akwiwu   – is a leading Court of Appeal authority on two important points of law: the first relating to the existence of post-termination victimisation claims in the light of a.108 of the Equality Act 2010 (where it was heard alongside the lead authority of Rowstock Ltd v Jessemey [2014] EWCA Civ 185, [2014] ICR 550) – the second concerning the validity of race discrimination claims in a migrant worker/human trafficking context – Taiwo v Olaigbe UKEAT/0254/12/KN,  [2014] ICR 571.

James undertakes training for the solicitors’ pro-bono group LawWorks.

Memberships


  • Employment Lawyers Association

Employment Cases


  • Onu v Akwiwu [2014] EWCA Civ 279, UKEAT/0283/12/RN, [2013] IRLR 523 EAT: A leading Court of Appeal authority on two important points of law: the first relating to the existence of post-termination victimisation claims in the light of a.108 of the Equality Act 2010 (where it was heard alongside the lead authority of Rowstock Ltd v Jessemey [2014] ICR 550) – The second concerning the validity of race discrimination claims in a migrant worker/human trafficking context [2014] ICR 571
  • Takavarasha v LB Newham & Ors UKEAT/0077/12/MC

Personal Injury


James represents claimants and defendants and regularly appears in a variety of fast track and multi-track claims. He has particular experience in relation to claims for trespass against the person, including assault and false imprisonment; human rights law; actions against the police and inquests. He is currently instructed on a series of claims in relation to injuries suffered by victims of human trafficking.

Public Law & Inquiries


James regularly advises on human rights law issues and judicial review proceedings – with particular experience in relation to inquest proceedings.

James has extensive experience representing bereaved families at high profile inquests and in subsequent civil claims, including for clinical negligence and claims under the Human Rights Act 1998. His inquest experience covers Article 2 inquests in relation to prisoners and patients detained under the Mental Health Act 1983; deaths in care homes, and suicide amongst young persons. His recent inquest experience includes:

Representing the family of Tallulah Wilson, who took her own life in October 2012 after having become involved with self-harm and suicide related blogs and websites. The case received nationwide media coverage.

Representing the brother of Patrick Whiting at the Article 2 ECHR, jury inquest into his death. Patrick hanged himself following multiple failures on the part of the mental health trust charged with his care.

Representing the family of Gwendolen Bingham, who died following a successful knee replacement revision operation, as a result of a failure to monitor and adequately care for her in hospital over during a weekend, leading to renal failure.

Representing the family of George Mason, an elderly dementia patient, and known wandering risk, who was allowed to go missing repeatedly from a care home before he tragically drowned in the river Chelmer.

 

Memberships


  • Inquest Lawyers Association
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